Food, Water and Climate Action Group

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Food, Water and Climate Action Group

Please come to our session “How Can Interreligious Dialogue Address global Food, Water and Climate Problems?” Friday morning at 11:30 - 1:00 - we need help drafting a new initiative on food and water for Inter-religious dialog and action.

Members: 28
Latest Activity: Apr 14, 2012

SIGN THE PETITION BELOW

SPECIAL SIGN UP TABLE IN THE GREAT HALL NEAR OTHER SIGNUP TABLES STARTING TUESDAY AFTERNOON - Sign up online OR at the Table

A Global Petition Supporting the Basic Food & Water Needs to Sustain a Healthy Life.

This document calls upon all interreligious leaders and concerned persons to signal their deep concern that the basic food and water needs to sustain a healthy life are not being met for over one billion people today, and their support for taking steps to alleviate world hunger and thirst. In signing this document as an individual you are indicating your personal support of its theme and contents.

Preamble. Whereas religious and spiritual leaders have gathered at the 2009 Parliament of the World’s Religions to discuss the causes and consequences of global food and water crises.

Whereas addressing these persistent global problems will require unprecedented levels of dedication, commitment and sacrifice by governmental and social institutions over a very long term.

Whereas religious institutions are, perhaps uniquely, capable of sustained, multi-generational action.

Whereas the secular and the religious spheres, working cooperatively, can forge the moral leadership and commitments necessary to achieve workable solutions to the global food and water crises.

Petition. Therefore, this is a call to recognize:

1. the right of all people to the basic food and clean drinking water necessary to sustain health and life;

2. that past successes of the Green Revolution and other innovative agricultural technologies in meeting food demands are not adequate to meet the needs of an expected world population of 9 billion in 2050;

3. that the most vulnerable increasingly include the urban poor in megacities of the developing world, as well as the rural poor and farmers in marginal environmental areas. All may be increasingly threatened by unpredictable weather and ill-advised political-economic decision making that will cause natural resource endowments to deteriorate further;

4. that the unintended consequences of the promotion of commercial agriculture and free trade can undermine basic rights to essential food and water;

5. that more than 90% of the food grown in the world is consumed in the country of production, and is mainly produced on small farms. Hence, international trade is only part of the answer;

6. that global economic policy should distinguish in times of food shortage between those food commodities necessary to sustain health and life and non-essential food commodities;

7. that vast quantities of food can be saved by improved storage, transport, distribution and processing as well as thoughtful consumption practices (including every household’s choice to limit consumption of animal foods, which are costly ecologically and economically) and that every person can help solve the problem of food insecurity with changes at personal, local and commercial levels;

8. that good governance of each country includes ensuring its population’s basic food and water requirements are met and that this, at times, may require export barriers, but only to the extent needed to meet the basic rights to food and water; and

9. the logic of country food security policies that include a combination of a realistic level of food self-sufficiency, grain storage and reliable trade contracts.

Call to Action. For efforts to meet the basic rights to food and water to be successful, they must be anchored in human and community moral and ethical values, which are promoted by the world’s religions. Therefore, we call upon all religious and spiritual leaders of the world to cooperate in helping to find solutions by:
a. Adopting a more compassionate response to the world’s hungry;
b. Committing to support basic rights to food and water; and
c. Articulating the moral bases to motivate the long-term personal and societal changes needed to eradicate food and water insecurity.

In accordance with the established policy of the Parliament of the World’s Religions, signing this "Melbourne Petition" does not represent the Parliament as a whole or its constituent members, partners or supporting agencies.


Please put your name, city/place, date and email below
Solomon H Katz Philadelphia, USA Dec. 5, 2009 skatz2001@aol.com
Joyce Anedrson Dec. 5, 2009
Antje Jackelin Stockholm, Sweden Dec. 5, 2009
Annie Keating Bundanoon, NSW, Australia Dec. 5, 2009
Shantr Godri? Dec. 5, 2009
Arthur Doyle? Dec. 5, 2009
Lors Steffen Colac 3250 Australia Dec. 5, 2009
Elizabeth Whiting Vanderbilt University Divinity School Dec. 5, 2009
Charline E. Manuel Dec. 5, 2009
Dolly Jehangir Dec. 5, 2009
A. Tel?? Dec. 4, 2009

Discussion Forum

Renewing the Active Discussion -The Food Crisis Continues

Started by sol katz Apr 6, 2010. 0 Replies

Upon arriving back from Melbourne and extended stay in the region, I was struck by the degree of food scarcity right in my home city of Philadelphia. With the economic downturn there are too many…Continue

Tags: Petition, hunger, Melbourne, Philadelphia, levels

SIGN "ONS" To the Statement

Started by sol katz Dec 9, 2009. 0 Replies

We have had approximately 100 signatures to the statement as of Weds. Dec. 9, 2009 - please add your name and support for this important document.

Securing food for all

Started by Prof/Dr (John) Lindsay Falvey Dec 2, 2009. 0 Replies

The premise that mixed objectives dilute international action suggests that we should focus on the most basic actions first. To me this, based on 40 years experience in the developing world and…Continue

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Food, Water and Climate Action Group to add comments!

Comment by The Parliament of Religions on March 26, 2012 at 10:51am

Some recent posts from the Parliament Blog concerning World Water Day: 

World Water Day: A Call to Faith

CPWR Chair Urges Interfaith Cooperation on Water Security

A Sermon for Water

Comment by sol katz on March 22, 2012 at 9:06pm

See the Blog Post for World Water Day and register your comments at this site, too! Also list resources from the Blog to our discussion group. We are getting ready for the 2014 Parliament and relaunching the discussion today! 

Comment by Jeremy Taylor on June 3, 2010 at 10:15am
Some information about my project.... Earth Survey Project - Please Participate!!
Comment by sol katz on December 6, 2009 at 9:37pm
The most recent version of the Global Spiral from the Metanexus Institute has a special article on our work on Compassion and the Food Crisis on the final morning of the Parliament on Weds Dec 9 at 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM Dec. 9 - Please see this article at
http://www.metanexus.net/Magazine/tabid/68/id/10940/Default.aspx
Comment by Brigid Walsh on December 4, 2009 at 8:23am
Hello Lindsay,

I heard you speak at Borderlands around this time last year and spoke to you and have read your books. I was unable to be at the morning session to-day but am interested the the new initiative you talk about on food and water and inter-religious dialog and action.

Last weekend GreenFaith Australia took two busloads of people around the South part of the Murray-Darling basin right up to The Murray itself on a pre-Parliament event titled Walking Humbly: a journey to The Murray. It was a great success and the Walking Humblies (as people now call themselves) will be forming a Network to stay in touch. Hopefully, they have all been converted on water issues.

Blessings and bliss
Brigid Walsh
Comment by sol katz on December 2, 2009 at 8:45pm
Please read and sign on with your name and place so we know how to follow up with you as the statement develops.
Comment by sol katz on December 2, 2009 at 7:25pm
A Global Petition Supporting the Basic Food & Water Needs to Sustain a Healthy Life.
This document calls upon all interreligious leaders and concerned persons to signal their deep concern that the basic food and water needs to sustain a healthy life are not being met for over one billion people today, and their support for taking steps to alleviate world hunger and thirst. In signing this document as an individual you are indicating your personal support of its theme and contents.

Preamble. Whereas religious and spiritual leaders have gathered at the 2009 Parliament of the World’s Religions to discuss the causes and consequences of global food and water crises.

Whereas addressing these persistent global problems will require unprecedented levels of dedication, commitment and sacrifice by governmental and social institutions over a very long term.

Whereas religious institutions are, perhaps uniquely, capable of sustained, multi-generational action.

Whereas the secular and the religious spheres, working cooperatively, can forge the moral leadership and commitments necessary to achieve workable solutions to the global food and water crises.

Petition. Therefore, this is a call to recognize:

1. the right of all people to the basic food and clean drinking water necessary to sustain health and life;

2. that past successes of the Green Revolution and other innovative agricultural technologies in meeting food demands are not adequate to meet the needs of an expected world population of 9 billion in 2050;

3. that the most vulnerable increasingly include the urban poor in megacities of the developing world, as well as the rural poor and farmers in marginal environmental areas. All may be increasingly threatened by unpredictable weather and ill-advised political-economic decision making that will cause natural resource endowments to deteriorate further;

4. that the unintended consequences of the promotion of commercial agriculture and free trade can undermine basic rights to essential food and water;

5. that more than 90% of the food grown in the world is consumed in the country of production, and is mainly produced on small farms. Hence, international trade is only part of the answer;

6. that global economic policy should distinguish in times of food shortage between those food commodities necessary to sustain health and life and non-essential food commodities;

7. that vast quantities of food can be saved by improved storage, transport, distribution and processing as well as thoughtful consumption practices (including every household’s choice to limit consumption of animal foods, which are costly ecologically and economically) and that every person can help solve the problem of food insecurity with changes at personal, local and commercial levels;

8. that good governance of each country includes ensuring its population’s basic food and water requirements are met and that this, at times, may require export barriers, but only to the extent needed to meet the basic rights to food and water; and

9. the logic of country food security policies that include a combination of a realistic level of food self-sufficiency, grain storage and reliable trade contracts.

Call to Action. For efforts to meet the basic rights to food and water to be successful, they must be anchored in human and community moral and ethical values, which are promoted by the world’s religions. Therefore, we call upon all religious and spiritual leaders of the world to cooperate in helping to find solutions by:
a. Adopting a more compassionate response to the world’s hungry;
b. Committing to support basic rights to food and water; and
c. Articulating the moral bases to motivate the long-term personal and societal changes needed to eradicate food and water insecurity.
In accordance with the established policy of the Parliament of the World’s Religions, signing this document does not represent the Parliament as a whole or its constituent members, partners or supporting agencies.
 

Members (28)